Artists interested in being represented by Gallery Guichard should submit images of their work and a biography to galleryguichardsocial@galleryguichard.com

The Nigerian-born artist Abiola Akintola -- referred to simply as “Abiola” -- began his formal study of art at a very young age. His early training enabled him to learn the anatomical parts of the figure quickly and thereby to grasp the importance of drawing a line that would activate the appearance of the figure in space. Although Abiola was persistently involved in drawing and oil painting throughout his years of schooling, he ultimately decided to obtain a degree in sculpture. While he enjoyed painting on a flat surface, he was also driven to work on material forms in actual space. Thus, sculpture allowed him to weld cast iron, to create complex cubist angles, and express the joy of movement as it related to the human likeness. For most of his career, including his time in Chicago – where Abiola has lived for more than two decades -- he has worked both as a painter and sculptor. He uses a variety of materials, including paint, metal, wood, clay, and discarded objects that he finds on the street. His interest in working with found objects, such as discarded soda cans from which he extracts shredded metal, has given him the label of “the Green Revolution Artist.”

The Nigerian-born artist Abiola Akintola -- referred to simply as “Abiola” -- began his formal study of art at a very young age. His early training enabled him to learn the anatomical parts of the figure quickly and thereby to grasp the importance of drawing a line that would activate the appearance of the figure in space. Although Abiola was persistently involved in drawing and oil painting throughout his years of schooling, he ultimately decided to obtain a degree in sculpture. While he enjoyed painting on a flat surface, he was also driven to work on material forms in actual space. Thus, sculpture allowed him to weld cast iron, to create complex cubist angles, and express the joy of movement as it related to the human likeness. For most of his career, including his time in Chicago – where Abiola has lived for more than two decades -- he has worked both as a painter and sculptor. He uses a variety of materials, including paint, metal, wood, clay, and discarded objects that he finds on the street. His interest in working with found objects, such as discarded soda cans from which he extracts shredded metal, has given him the label of “the Green Revolution Artist.”

Sayo Olalekan started his career as an artist at a tender age with lots of interest in Biblical theme and illustration. His love for nature and colours started quite early due to the topography and the climatic condition of the environment he grew up as a child. Noticing the unique ability to create and compose things out of his imagination, his parent started supporting him by buying him the needed materials and tools which propelled him to work even more harder. He won his first state and national award in art while in junior secondary school at Oyo State College of Education Model High School, Oyo (now Emmanuel Alayande College of Education Model High School, Oyo) where he came first and second respectively in the competition themed “The Effect of Pollution” which was organized by Fanta and Old Oyo National Park in the year 2003. This propelled him to better himself in the world of creativity through constant practice but not to the detriment of his formal education. In his quest to find an answer to the essence of life .... Who we are and our hidden self..... He developed a new approach and style of rendering his thought. It’s going to be a long journey but will certainly get there.

Sayo Olalekan started his career as an artist at a tender age with lots of interest in Biblical theme and illustration. His love for nature and colours started quite early due to the topography and the climatic condition of the environment he grew up as a child. Noticing the unique ability to create and compose things out of his imagination, his parent started supporting him by buying him the needed materials and tools which propelled him to work even more harder. He won his first state and national award in art while in junior secondary school at Oyo State College of Education Model High School, Oyo (now Emmanuel Alayande College of Education Model High School, Oyo) where he came first and second respectively in the competition themed “The Effect of Pollution” which was organized by Fanta and Old Oyo National Park in the year 2003. This propelled him to better himself in the world of creativity through constant practice but not to the detriment of his formal education. In his quest to find an answer to the essence of life .... Who we are and our hidden self..... He developed a new approach and style of rendering his thought. It’s going to be a long journey but will certainly get there.

An award winning artist, Roger Carter’s first real devotion to street art style was revealed during the late eighties as a teenager. It was at that time that his thirst for creation exploded after seeing street art emanate from the streets of Chicago. The enormity of the works and the care free expression of color displayed a means by which someone could gain the attention sought by every kid. This rebellious idea of searching for identity through the use of markers and spray paint fueled Carter’s imagination. So, he redesigned his sketch books and followed in the footsteps of graffiti artists. Carter’s vision is to capture the persona of the African American experience through representations of iconic images and expressions unique to the experiences of African Americans. In his exploration, he has found himself in a creative battle between street art and abstract; mixing past experiences with abstract expressions. As feelings are evoked from the emotionally charged imagery he leaves on canvas, Carter’s artistic soul reveals itself with a flurry of whirling paint and exploding spray paint cans.

An award winning artist, Roger Carter’s first real devotion to street art style was revealed during the late eighties as a teenager. It was at that time that his thirst for creation exploded after seeing street art emanate from the streets of Chicago. The enormity of the works and the care free expression of color displayed a means by which someone could gain the attention sought by every kid. This rebellious idea of searching for identity through the use of markers and spray paint fueled Carter’s imagination. So, he redesigned his sketch books and followed in the footsteps of graffiti artists. Carter’s vision is to capture the persona of the African American experience through representations of iconic images and expressions unique to the experiences of African Americans. In his exploration, he has found himself in a creative battle between street art and abstract; mixing past experiences with abstract expressions. As feelings are evoked from the emotionally charged imagery he leaves on canvas, Carter’s artistic soul reveals itself with a flurry of whirling paint and exploding spray paint cans.


In 1984, Raymond A Thomas attended the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. Soon after graduating, Thomas was hired by the historic Johnson Publishing Company where he served as the art director for 23 years. He also continued growing his art practice with showings of his studio work in art exhibitions in Chicago and galleries nationwide. In 2001, Thomas shifted some of his creative focus towards filmmaking. The short film “12 Minutes” told the story of a death row inmate whose last wish before his execution was to see his son who he has never met. “12 Minutes” was an official selection to over 20 film festivals worldwide, winning many awards and honors. Since then, Thomas has written, produced and directed numerous narratives and documentary films. In 2006, Thomas co-wrote “Death of Innocence”. The feature film, based on the award winning book of the same name, is the story of slain civil rights hero Emmett Till and his courageous mother Mamie Till-Mobley. The script was later optioned by HBO.

In 1984, Raymond A Thomas attended the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. Soon after graduating, Thomas was hired by the historic Johnson Publishing Company where he served as the art director for 23 years. He also continued growing his art practice with showings of his studio work in art exhibitions in Chicago and galleries nationwide. In 2001, Thomas shifted some of his creative focus towards filmmaking. The short film “12 Minutes” told the story of a death row inmate whose last wish before his execution was to see his son who he has never met. “12 Minutes” was an official selection to over 20 film festivals worldwide, winning many awards and honors. Since then, Thomas has written, produced and directed numerous narratives and documentary films. In 2006, Thomas co-wrote “Death of Innocence”. The feature film, based on the award winning book of the same name, is the story of slain civil rights hero Emmett Till and his courageous mother Mamie Till-Mobley. The script was later optioned by HBO.

Alpha Bruton completed her studies in the art education and Teacher’s Credential Program in 1990 from the California State University of Sacramento. Upon moving to Illinois, she completed her studies in the Masters of Art in Administration Program at the School of the Art Institute in May of 2001. Formal training in studio art, art education, dance production, theater arts, and art gallery management gives Bruton the foundation to manage art educations programs.   Currently she is an artist and art consultant, a teaching artist listed in the Illinois Arts Council Arts Education Program Roster, and a vendor for Chicago Public Schools.  Her curatorial practice is the Phantom Gallery Chicago, where she is the Chief Curator, and board of director’s administrator. She also serves on the board of the Visual Arts Development Project, An Art Service Organization-developing projects as living experiments for sustainable practices and an incubator for personal and collective transformation.

Alpha Bruton completed her studies in the art education and Teacher’s Credential Program in 1990 from the California State University of Sacramento. Upon moving to Illinois, she completed her studies in the Masters of Art in Administration Program at the School of the Art Institute in May of 2001. Formal training in studio art, art education, dance production, theater arts, and art gallery management gives Bruton the foundation to manage art educations programs.   Currently she is an artist and art consultant, a teaching artist listed in the Illinois Arts Council Arts Education Program Roster, and a vendor for Chicago Public Schools.  Her curatorial practice is the Phantom Gallery Chicago, where she is the Chief Curator, and board of director’s administrator. She also serves on the board of the Visual Arts Development Project, An Art Service Organization-developing projects as living experiments for sustainable practices and an incubator for personal and collective transformation.

After graduating from Lincoln University where he earned a B.S. degree in Early Childhood Education, Calvin Coleman taught at the elementary level for fourteen years. In 2004, Coleman made the transition that changed his life forever. Following his passion, Calvin’s paintings have shown in a number of galleries throughout the United States and Europe. As a self-taught artist, that incorporates Abstract Expressionism and Fauvism, Coleman builds upon the canvas with an assemblage of heavy body acrylic paint, a variety of textiles and other mediums to embellish his uninhibited style of painting. The inspirations behind the contemporary style that Coleman conveys to his audience, has much to do with his spirituality, love for nature’s beauty, lyrics of songs from a vast genre of music, and his journey through life.  

After graduating from Lincoln University where he earned a B.S. degree in Early Childhood Education, Calvin Coleman taught at the elementary level for fourteen years. In 2004, Coleman made the transition that changed his life forever. Following his passion, Calvin’s paintings have shown in a number of galleries throughout the United States and Europe. As a self-taught artist, that incorporates Abstract Expressionism and Fauvism, Coleman builds upon the canvas with an assemblage of heavy body acrylic paint, a variety of textiles and other mediums to embellish his uninhibited style of painting. The inspirations behind the contemporary style that Coleman conveys to his audience, has much to do with his spirituality, love for nature’s beauty, lyrics of songs from a vast genre of music, and his journey through life.  


Miah Juantaine is an African American artist that has been featured in different galleries and art shows. Born Jamiah Juantaine Calvin, he grew up on the west side of Chicago where he painted and drew a lot as a child to stay out of trouble in the neighborhood where he lived. His first job was an art apprentice at Gallery 37 at the age of 14. As he got older his love for art has become stronger. He now attends Northern Illinois University where he is working on his Bachelor of Fine Art. He is skilled in mediums such as charcoal, pastel and oil painting which happens to be his favorite. His style is a mixture expressionism and surrealism. Miah's goal is to capture deep emotion within the viewer of all his pieces by narrating an unwritten story through his art. 

Miah Juantaine is an African American artist that has been featured in different galleries and art shows. Born Jamiah Juantaine Calvin, he grew up on the west side of Chicago where he painted and drew a lot as a child to stay out of trouble in the neighborhood where he lived. His first job was an art apprentice at Gallery 37 at the age of 14. As he got older his love for art has become stronger. He now attends Northern Illinois University where he is working on his Bachelor of Fine Art. He is skilled in mediums such as charcoal, pastel and oil painting which happens to be his favorite. His style is a mixture expressionism and surrealism. Miah's goal is to capture deep emotion within the viewer of all his pieces by narrating an unwritten story through his art. 

Maxwell Emcays is a Chicago based multidisciplinary creative who began his journey creating digitally born work, knowing a t-shirt as his only canvas. The t-shirt presents itself as an allegory that references the social structure that his work seeks to navigate. His multi-layered work strives to create dialog around these institutionalized barriers while presenting a more overt conscious meaning. Stylistically, he references abstract expressionism, pop art and Afrocentrism. He channels his making process and rendering to echo the underlying theme.  His work has been seen in Miami Art Basel, Chicago galleries, the DuSable Museum, private collections and highlighted on NBC’s “Making a Difference”.

Maxwell Emcays is a Chicago based multidisciplinary creative who began his journey creating digitally born work, knowing a t-shirt as his only canvas. The t-shirt presents itself as an allegory that references the social structure that his work seeks to navigate. His multi-layered work strives to create dialog around these institutionalized barriers while presenting a more overt conscious meaning. Stylistically, he references abstract expressionism, pop art and Afrocentrism. He channels his making process and rendering to echo the underlying theme.  His work has been seen in Miami Art Basel, Chicago galleries, the DuSable Museum, private collections and highlighted on NBC’s “Making a Difference”.

Arrington Porter was born in Evanston, IL 1993. He was raised most of his life in Murfreesboro, TN. He began his career as an artist while studying at Northern Illinois University in 2011. His main concentration is oil painting. Much of his work is centered around his experiences and relationships with people throughout his life. He covers subjects that relate to what is currently taking place in society, as well as his own interpretation of occurrences in his personal life.

Arrington Porter was born in Evanston, IL 1993. He was raised most of his life in Murfreesboro, TN. He began his career as an artist while studying at Northern Illinois University in 2011. His main concentration is oil painting. Much of his work is centered around his experiences and relationships with people throughout his life. He covers subjects that relate to what is currently taking place in society, as well as his own interpretation of occurrences in his personal life.


A Detroit native currently residing in both Chicago and Detroit, Darren Pollard uses a wide range of mediums to create a kaleidoscope of intertwining themes. At the age of 18, Pollard moved to Chicago from Detroit to attend DeVry Institute of Technology. After a classmate sold him a Pentax camera for fifty dollars, he ultimately dropped out and roamed the streets of Chicago taking photographs of everything he saw.  After returning to school, Pollard received a BS in Psychology from Illinois State University, and then moved to Springfield, IL to pursue a Master’s Degree in Community Arts Management. After 4 years in Springfield, Pollard moved to the Wicker Park neighborhood in Chicago. Pollard credits living in Wicker Park in the mid-to-late-nineties as his first real exposure to artist who made a living painting.

A Detroit native currently residing in both Chicago and Detroit, Darren Pollard uses a wide range of mediums to create a kaleidoscope of intertwining themes. At the age of 18, Pollard moved to Chicago from Detroit to attend DeVry Institute of Technology. After a classmate sold him a Pentax camera for fifty dollars, he ultimately dropped out and roamed the streets of Chicago taking photographs of everything he saw.  After returning to school, Pollard received a BS in Psychology from Illinois State University, and then moved to Springfield, IL to pursue a Master’s Degree in Community Arts Management. After 4 years in Springfield, Pollard moved to the Wicker Park neighborhood in Chicago. Pollard credits living in Wicker Park in the mid-to-late-nineties as his first real exposure to artist who made a living painting.

Born and raised in Dumas, AR, Susan (Holley) Williams is a graduate of the University of Arkansas at Fayetteville, where she studied art and interior design. Susan began her early career as a professional interior designer in Little Rock, AR. She continued her profession as a designer while teaching high school art for the Little Rock School District. She furthered her professional training by studying under two of the most recognized sculptors of recent times, Ev Angelo’s Frudakis of Colorado and Martine Vaugel of Paris, France. Inspired by works of 16th century master sculptor, painter and architect Michelangelo, Susan embraces both sculpture and interior design with great passion. It is for this reason she was selected as one of the designers for the William Jefferson Clinton Foundation Building and personal office. Her pursuit of excellence and commitment to civic concerns have earned her governor and trustee appointed positions to numerous boards of directors, notably, the Arkansas Art Center, the Arkansas Humanities Council, and the AR Sculptors Guild. Susan’s work has been exhibited and/or purchased by the Historic Arkansas Museum, the Cox Museum, the Winthrop Rockefeller Museum, the Mosaic Templars Museum, the African American Art Exhibit in Louisville KY, The New Power Generation show at Hampton University in Hampton VA, and The National Sculptors Guild. Susan has lived in Chicago since 2006.

Born and raised in Dumas, AR, Susan (Holley) Williams is a graduate of the University of Arkansas at Fayetteville, where she studied art and interior design. Susan began her early career as a professional interior designer in Little Rock, AR. She continued her profession as a designer while teaching high school art for the Little Rock School District. She furthered her professional training by studying under two of the most recognized sculptors of recent times, Ev Angelo’s Frudakis of Colorado and Martine Vaugel of Paris, France. Inspired by works of 16th century master sculptor, painter and architect Michelangelo, Susan embraces both sculpture and interior design with great passion. It is for this reason she was selected as one of the designers for the William Jefferson Clinton Foundation Building and personal office. Her pursuit of excellence and commitment to civic concerns have earned her governor and trustee appointed positions to numerous boards of directors, notably, the Arkansas Art Center, the Arkansas Humanities Council, and the AR Sculptors Guild. Susan’s work has been exhibited and/or purchased by the Historic Arkansas Museum, the Cox Museum, the Winthrop Rockefeller Museum, the Mosaic Templars Museum, the African American Art Exhibit in Louisville KY, The New Power Generation show at Hampton University in Hampton VA, and The National Sculptors Guild. Susan has lived in Chicago since 2006.

Pearlie Taylor was born in Mississippi and raised in Chicago. Her earliest memories of involvement with art include selling drawings on notebook paper for five cents to classmates in the third grade. As a young adult while raising five children and working in the catalog advertising department at Sears, she took classes at the American Academy of Art in Chicago and spent many years “dabbling” in watercolor, oils, charcoal, and pastels. She didn’t pick-up acrylics until early 2000. Pearlie’s artwork is instinctual, more about feeling than intellectualizing. She believes the use of color can affect a conscious and positive change in individuals, creating a “subliminal communication”. She confronts her canvas without a preconceived idea and over time has learned to trust in the process itself and be guided by instinct.

Pearlie Taylor was born in Mississippi and raised in Chicago. Her earliest memories of involvement with art include selling drawings on notebook paper for five cents to classmates in the third grade. As a young adult while raising five children and working in the catalog advertising department at Sears, she took classes at the American Academy of Art in Chicago and spent many years “dabbling” in watercolor, oils, charcoal, and pastels. She didn’t pick-up acrylics until early 2000. Pearlie’s artwork is instinctual, more about feeling than intellectualizing. She believes the use of color can affect a conscious and positive change in individuals, creating a “subliminal communication”. She confronts her canvas without a preconceived idea and over time has learned to trust in the process itself and be guided by instinct.


Alan Emerson Hicks, a sculptor and performance artist working in the media of found objects and time. Alan studied sculpture at Illinois State University with a professor from the graduate program of Rutgers University. Alan feels he received an East Coast education in the Midwest. Alan's sculpture projects emphasized concept over material. An Idea that continues in his work today. Alan’s recent work began when jazz conductor, Dan Godston, challenged him to create sculpture during one of his performances. It was Alan’s concept to begin, work on and finish the sculpture during the set. Alan started working with materials, found objects, that reflected a sense of urgency. This experience lead Alan to work primarily with found, reused and discarded materials. Alan would like the viewer to see the plastic objects of their lives re-purposed. Hopefully changing the way, they discard these materials.

Alan Emerson Hicks, a sculptor and performance artist working in the media of found objects and time. Alan studied sculpture at Illinois State University with a professor from the graduate program of Rutgers University. Alan feels he received an East Coast education in the Midwest. Alan's sculpture projects emphasized concept over material. An Idea that continues in his work today. Alan’s recent work began when jazz conductor, Dan Godston, challenged him to create sculpture during one of his performances. It was Alan’s concept to begin, work on and finish the sculpture during the set. Alan started working with materials, found objects, that reflected a sense of urgency. This experience lead Alan to work primarily with found, reused and discarded materials. Alan would like the viewer to see the plastic objects of their lives re-purposed. Hopefully changing the way, they discard these materials.

Basil Watson has been surrounded by art through his entire life, being the son of renowned painter Barring Watson, and has been sculpting for over 40 years. He is considered by his homeland Jamaica to be their foremost sculptor, having over 30 public sculptures erected across the island. Since moving to Atlanta, he has continued to gain international acclaim across many other countries around the world as a premier figurative sculptor. Basil has participated in international symposia having monumental works in Changchun, China and Guatemala City, Guatemala. Basil’s work is in numerous private and public collections including the National Center for the Study of Civil Rights and African American Culture T Alabama State University M as well as the collection of HRH Prince Harry who unveiled his sculpture “RINGS OF LIFE” at the Victoria Jubilee Hospital, Kingston Jamaica, on the occasion of the commemoration of Queen Elizabeth’s Golden Jubilee. 

Basil Watson has been surrounded by art through his entire life, being the son of renowned painter Barring Watson, and has been sculpting for over 40 years. He is considered by his homeland Jamaica to be their foremost sculptor, having over 30 public sculptures erected across the island. Since moving to Atlanta, he has continued to gain international acclaim across many other countries around the world as a premier figurative sculptor. Basil has participated in international symposia having monumental works in Changchun, China and Guatemala City, Guatemala. Basil’s work is in numerous private and public collections including the National Center for the Study of Civil Rights and African American Culture T Alabama State University M as well as the collection of HRH Prince Harry who unveiled his sculpture “RINGS OF LIFE” at the Victoria Jubilee Hospital, Kingston Jamaica, on the occasion of the commemoration of Queen Elizabeth’s Golden Jubilee. 

Identical twin brothers Jerry Lynn and Terry Lynn, make up the artistic duo known as Twin and theirs is one of the most incredible stories in the art industry. A true artistic phenomenon, the painting styles and techniques of Twin are as connected as their physical presence. Born and raised in the suburbs of Memphis, Tennessee, the artists were highly influenced by the vibrant sounds of blues and jazz, which carries into their art. First published in 1995, the collaborative paintings of Twin are an overwhelming success. Offering a wealth of versatility, both artists are proficient in realism, as well as abstract painting styles; in working in oil or acrylic; and in fine art print making. Jerry and Terry Lynn have been the official artists of the Essence Music Awards, The Tom Joyner Foundation Cruise, The Kentucky Derby Grand Gala, Black Enterprise Golf & Tennis Challenge and The Links, Inc. to name just a few. 

Identical twin brothers Jerry Lynn and Terry Lynn, make up the artistic duo known as Twin and theirs is one of the most incredible stories in the art industry. A true artistic phenomenon, the painting styles and techniques of Twin are as connected as their physical presence. Born and raised in the suburbs of Memphis, Tennessee, the artists were highly influenced by the vibrant sounds of blues and jazz, which carries into their art. First published in 1995, the collaborative paintings of Twin are an overwhelming success. Offering a wealth of versatility, both artists are proficient in realism, as well as abstract painting styles; in working in oil or acrylic; and in fine art print making. Jerry and Terry Lynn have been the official artists of the Essence Music Awards, The Tom Joyner Foundation Cruise, The Kentucky Derby Grand Gala, Black Enterprise Golf & Tennis Challenge and The Links, Inc. to name just a few.